Making the move from a DSLR to the Fuji X pro system.

June 27, 2013  •  3 Comments

I see lots of questions regarding moving from a DSLR to the Fuji X pro system, whilst I have moved fully into the Fuji camp and have been extremly happy with my choice, many will be somewhat disappointed with the system. The Fuji Xpro 1 is a visual delight, and engineered to a really high standard, the image delivery is incredible, colour accuracy is superb. The recent firmware upgrades are a welcome addition, (these really should have been implemented a long time ago). Just having the ability to quickly change focus area on the thumbpad is joyous.

I usually see the grumbles about autofocus speed to be the main gripe, and one that leads folk to stay with the DSLR. However if you persevere and learn how to use the camera, learn how to overcome its focus issues, you will be so pleased with the image results. Once focus is found its totally bang on. I have always loved Fuji for their approach to applying their knowledge gained in film development, and applying this to their digital camera systems. The jpegs are faultless, I looked at raw files and found no real gains to be had by using raw mode, this applies only to my thinking and I am not wishing to create a raw/jpeg debate. It suits my workflow.

I remain totally in love with the system, but sometimes get quite infuriated at Fuji seemingly lack of understanding when it comes to camera ergonomics. Why produce a lovely little handgrip, that leaves you no access to the battery/card chamber, go figure!! Generally speaking the niggles I have with this little beauty are forgiven when I see the results from the Xtrans sensor printed as a 40x30 print.

Lenses that have so far been introduced on the Fuji roadmap, have been fantastic, the 14mm is an absolute gem of a lens. The 55-200 is fast becoming my favourite although slow focus maybe an issue with street shooters, once focus is found its bang on the money. I have shot 2 weddings with the new lenses as well as the 35mm 1.4 and have not found the little X pro 1 wanting. It causes quite a stir when guests see you toting this around.

My carry round kit also includes the tiny little Fuji Ef20 flash gun, which being quite small complements the X pro 1 so well. For a little flash it produces some stunning results and for £79 is quite a steal. The flash has bounce too, and if you whack the iso up enough you can get very well lit pictures using the bounce. All my groups at sundays wedding were lit using this little guy. Just remember though it only takes 2 aa's so runs out of juice quite quickly. I used some nimh 2800s and they lasted pretty well.

An image taken on a bright sunny day with the Fuji EF20, these yellow poppies were shot a 1/250 @f16 Iso 200, the 35mm is pin sharp.

The 55-200mm continues to impressbackground rendering is so smooth.

Dandelion head shot at 200mm 1/250@ F7.1 Iso 200

White Gerbera 200mm 1/680@F4.8 Iso 200 backlit by a sinking sun. Just the right amount of depth of field

 

 

A recent outing to the Yorkshire Dales yielded some lovley images courtesy of the 14mm and 55-200 mm lenses

The limestone grykes at Twistleton Scar highlighted by Crepuscular rays. 14mm 1/1600th@f11 iso 400

Sheepswool caught in barbed wire 14mm 1/1250th@5.6 iso400

Thornton Force Ingleton 55-200 mm 1/60th@f13 iso 100 handheld

 

Thornton Force Ingleton 55-200 1/60th@f13 iso 100 handheld

 

I will leave you with some recent pictures taken in the White peak part of Derbyshire, along the road to the village of Earl Sterndale

A tree clings to the side of Wheeldon Hill 55-200 1/250th@f6.4 iso200

Late evening light over Wheeldon Hill 14mm 1/680@f22 iso 200

Chesnut Trees at the end of a meadow. 1/220th@f11 iso 200

 

 

 

 


Comments

3.Wow, congratulations.(non-registered)
Your photography is probably the best I've seen from an X-E1.

I was very interested in your comments that you are so happy with the camera's JPEG files that you don't shoot RAW. Seeing as you're so accomplished and producing such excellent results, that's advice worth heeding.

I have an X-E1 too but have been shooting RAW. I was wondering if you wouldn't mind sharing some suggestions on picture settings? Do you tend to have different custom settings stored for different subjects? Do you especially like any of the particular film types? Are the results in your pictures above pretty much straight out of the camera, or do you still a bit of post production on them?

If I got anywhere close to your achievements, I'd be very happy. Congratulations again and thanks for your interesting comments.
2.W Yuhasz(non-registered)
I am following your new journey with the Fuji X Pro 1: I am doing the same thing.

Your sample photos are very good landscapes and the best recommendation for using the Fuji gear.

Thank you for sharing your work and thoughts.
1.Stephen Scharf(non-registered)
Nick, excellent post and one which, personally, I wholeheartedly agree. Using my X-Pro1 has proved to be a revelation for me, and rekindled my passion for photography after becoming jaded from a decade of pro motorsports photojournalism.

The image quality from the X-Pro1 continues to blow me away; I've shot with a lot of gear over the last decade since moving to digital, and nothing I've used can touch it, incuding a Canon 1Dx I rented recently.

Interesting comments about the use of the flash; are you using it on-camera, or handheld/off-camera?

All the photos are wonderful, the close-ups ot the dandelion and White Gerbera are particularly nice.

But the black and white landscape is just *amazing*! Wow.

That 14 is impressive. Mine arrives today and I look forward to using it on a holiday trip next week to the Eastern Sierra in Northern California.

Cheers,
Stephen Scharf
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